Tag Archives: Loveless

Top 30 Videos of 2012: The Top 10!

ywgav102012

Friends, Romans, countrymen – lend me your eyes!

Twenty excellent videos over four weeks has brought us to this very moment, where we take a look at the ten absolute best videos of 2012. From dentist appointments across the pond to love in a Korean elevator and back, it’s been a remarkably varied and endlessly fascinating year for music videos. Here’s hoping 2013 can hold a candle! For now, though, here are THE TOP TEN VIDEOS OF 2012 ACCORDING TO YES, WE’VE GOT A VIDEO!

+++

10. Milhouse – Cereal
Directed by Tim Harris

As you’ve probably seen on this blog over the past two and a half years, a great music video has no set format. A million dollar budget doesn’t guarantee excellence, neither does a shoe-string budget. Sometimes, however, all you need is a single camera and a crazy idea. Such is the case with Sydney band Milhouse. Earlier in the year, they had the chance to work with a team at NIDA on a video after winning  a Triple J Unearthed competition. As fun as that clip was, however, what they followed it up with would far surpass any NIDA chin-stroking. The premise: See how much cereal bass player Dave Drayton could work his way through in the 2.5 minute run-time of his band’s imaginatively-titled Cereal. Is it stupid? Magnificently stupid. Stupid like a fox. That’s more or less the entire point. It’s a fantastically endearing attempt to take a joke and run with it.

Read my original post on Cereal here.

9. Tellison – Freud Links the Teeth and the Heart
Directed by Tim Peck

This came out of nowhere – I genuinely can’t remember exactly how it ended up on my screen. Nevertheless, I’m so very glad that it did – Freud Links the Teeth… ended up becoming one of my most-watched and most-beloved videos of the year. Here, the band take what would normally be a boring and dreary place – in this case, the dentist’s office – and turn it into a place where anything could happen. Flourishes of romance and flirting, a horrific twist in the dentist’s chair and even a bit of a sing-along with the four patients in the waiting room, who have all conveniently brought along their instruments of choice. It’s funny, it’s sweet, it’s a little bit mental. Really, it’s one hell of a way to make a lasting impression.

Read my original post on Freud Links the Teeth and the Heart here.

8. Justin Bieber feat. Big Sean – As Long as You Love Me
Directed by Anthony Mandler

If you saw the brilliant Ask a Network Executive parody last year, sketch comic Brian Firenzi played Michael Destiny, the Head of Programming at MTV. As much as I laughed at this sharply-acted sketch, I wanted to argue the point made that popular videos are more worthless now than ever before. You could indeed argue in the affirmative of that statement, using everyone from Flo Rida to Reece Mastin as examples. That said, I’m disagreeing – and I’m using this video as my leading most recent example. Has the Biebs been guilty of shitty, product-placement-driven videos in the past? As sin. But Christ, he was FIFTEEN. I’d have done anything Usher told me to do at fifteen – fuck, I probably still would. Regardless, this video was a game-changer. With director Anthony Mandler and Reservoir Dogs‘ own Michael Madsen in tow, Bieber delivered a Michael Jackson-esque high-concept pop clip. It’s confronting, impeccably choreographed and just a bit edgier and darker than anything Biebs had done prior. Really, the only reason you haven’t given it a chance yet is because your friends think Bieber is “lame” or “gay” or whatever the equivalent is with your age group. Fuck them.

Read my original post on As Long as You Love Me here.

7. M.I.A. – Bad Girls
Directed by Romain Gavras

2005: A young, fresh and stunningly beautiful face drops (seemingly literally) from the sky and welcomes us to the jungle with the dazzling, bold video for Sunshowaz. 2007: The aforementioned face has become M.I.A., international breakthrough artist who appears on Letterman and gets the Beastie Boys to cameo in her New York-shot video for smash hit Paper Planes. 2010: M.I.A. releases her clip for Born Free, a nine-minute clip depicting genocide and war that has gone on to become one of the most talked-about music videos of the past 15 years. It’s no stretch to say that M.I.A. has built a legacy on her clips – so, in 2012, with all but a single to her name, she knew she had to make her only video of the year count. Reinlisting Born Free director Romain Gravas, known for aggressive and intense clips, was the wise first step. The next was taking Bad Girls to Morocco – specifically, the city of Ourarzazate. The rest essentially played itself out – jaw-dropping car stunts, a knowing mockery of big-budget Western hip-hop clips and a message of endearment, empowerment and liberation. “Bad girls do it well?” Too right.

Read my original post on Bad Girls here.

6. St. Vincent – Cheerleader
Directed by Hiro Murai

Last year, I made great note of the contrast between the opening and closing shots of my number 2 video of the year, Children Collide‘s Loveless. I can draw a similar parallel here, in which Cheerleader begins with Annie Clark – aka St. Vincent – laying on the floor, oblivious to what surrounds are. It ends with Clark yet again on the floor – this time, however, in literal ruins; and all too aware of where she is. Cheerleader is a video that astounded and baffled me on my first few viewings – hell, I pretty much openly admitted to having no idea exactly what the whole thing was about. On reflection, I’ve come to terms with what I see in Cheerleader – this is a video that takes an idea about feminine perception and artistic ideals and makes it gargantuan, ugly and disastrous. It’s a mirror-turn on pretension and objectification. This is what so many women go through each and every day – at least from a metaphorical or internal perspective. Really, Cheerleader says so much without really saying anything at all.

Read my original post on Cheerleader here.

5. The Shins – Simple Song
Directed by DANIELS

From fancy ice-skating to origami cows, The Shins have always delivered videos that delve into the fantastical and the strangely delightful. It was fitting, then, that they delivered what is quite possibly their best video ever at what was quite possibly the most crucial time to have one – at a stage of re-introduction. This video came five years after the band’s last album, Wincing the Night Away. In that time, the band had relocated and changed practically its entire line-up save for bandleader James Mercer. Essentially, this would serve as an introduction to a new generation – yes, you’d be damn surprised how much can change in five years – as well as a reminder for fans who may have forgotten about them. In both regards, this video delivered in spectacular fashion – the new band members play estranged siblings, brought back to their old family house by their deceased dad, played by Mercer. Imagine The Royal Tenenbaums with its cast halved and sped up to 3.5 minutes, adding in some slapstick for extra measure, and you’re halfway to capturing the bittersweet magic of this clip. From the switching between VHS footage and present day to the wrecking crew finale, there is just so much to take in, adore and enjoy here. If anything, it’s a great reminder that the family that fights together, stays together.

Read my original post on Simple Song here.

4. Grimes – Oblivion
Directed by Emily Kai Bock

Just to give you some sort of idea on the power of this video – the director, Emily Kai Bock, actually pulled out of studying a degree in film in order to keep up with the demand of work she got in the wake of this clip’s release. Millions of views and countless accolades later, it’s easy to note Oblivion as one of the defining moments of music videos, pop music, indie crossover… whatever timeline you’re looking down, Oblivion is there. This collaboration between Bock and lispy Canadian darling Clare Boucher was born out of a mere exercise in visual contrast. What happens when you take Boucher – petite, fairy-like, wide-eyed, innocent, sweetly dancing and miming to her own song playing on a portable CD player of all things – and place it in the fiercely masculine world of live sports? The reactions run from pure confusion of some gridiron players to an overly enthusiastic bro dancing away and making up his own words to lip-sync along to. There’s a later scene where a dozen shirtless dudes start slam-dancing behind her, while she’s dressed like a character out of The Crucible and, just like clear influence Robyn, dancing on her own. Is it meant to highlight just what dropkicks men can be when surrounded by beer and sport? Is it meant to show that these type of events aren’t just for beer-soaked cock-rockers anymore? Sure, Oblivion raises more questions than answers them – but the fact that they’re even being raised in the first place is proof alone that this was must-watch music television. Hell, it still is, regardless of your play count.

Read my original post on Oblivion here.

3. Lambchop – Gone Tomorrow
Directed by Zack Spiger

Let’s get this one out of the way. Is Gone Tomorrow so high because of my love of pro wrestling? In a way, yes. But there’s a lot more to it than that. Gone Tomorrow is a celebration of the everyman that isn’t like every man. For every guy that works just as hard at what they do than their friends and neighbours and gets a quarter of the credit. Obviously you don’t have to be a pro wrestler to have an occupation that’s somewhat out of the ordinary – but it certainly makes for great aesthetics in this clip. We’re not talking WWE levels of pro wrestling, either – this is bingo hall stuff, the overlooked and under-appreciated indie circuit. From the moment Kurt Wagner picks up a giant wrestler in his car to the second their match ends, you know that there’s going to be no moment of glory. There’s no Mickey Rourke tale of overcoming adversity. To these guys, it’s just another day on the job. Wagner is just an observer here, intrigued by his surrounds. It’s played out with no judgement – and, in a way, that’s what makes Gone Tomorrow so stirringly beautiful.

Read my original post on Gone Tomorrow here.

2. PSY – Gangnam Style
Directed by Lee Bo Young

Few things have gone so remarkably quickly from “OMG, have you SEEN this?” to “OMG, why won’t this go away?” than Gangnam Style. We went from making the guy a cult hero to public enemy number one within the course of roughly half a year. Pop culture? POP CULTURE? Gangnam Style fucking WAS pop culture in 2012 – and, yes, we know how edgy you are for thinking that this video is – quote – “gay” – unquote. But we’re not here to talk about that. We’re here to discuss the remarkably odd and strangely inspiring tale of PSY, the mid-30s Korean pop star who became 2012’s least likely pop sensation roughly half-a-dozen albums into his career. Despite notable success in his homeland, it never crossed over with a western audience. This can be said for most of the K-pop world, save for a few YouTube hits that have bedazzled and befuddled countless English speakers for their brightly-coloured sugar rushes and plotless oddities. Perhaps what worked for Gangnam Style was the fact that it was in on the joke. Many of the K-pop videos of the past few years have felt like you’re laughing at them – with Gangnam Style, we were quite clearly laughing with the guy as he poked fun at the rich lifestyle in Seoul. Audiences of all ages found themselves with a different favourite part – whether it was the arse screaming, the elevator dance or the world-famous invisible horse. To this day, I’m fascinated by the series of events that lead to this becoming literally the most viewed video in the history of the internet – take that, Evolution of Dance! You don’t need to click above and watch it again, but take a moment to think about the weight of this statement: Gangnam Style has changed the way we think about pop videos, hit singles, technology and the power of “viral” internet trends. Not bad for a song with literally three words of English in it.

1. Spiritualized – Hey Jane
Directed by AG Rojas

There’s a very, very distinct difference that needs to be made here. Hey Jane is, far and away, the single best music video of 2012. It is, however, by no means my most-watched video of the year. Hell, I’ve probably watched it less than some of the videos that didn’t even make the cut for my top 30. Even with some of those views, I haven’t been able to make it through the entire thing. So, how does a video like this end up at the top of the list? It’s very, very simple: Hey Jane is the single most powerful piece of film I saw in all of last year. It’s gritty, it’s uncomfortable, it’s raw, it’s a complete punch in the guts at times. This isn’t a smile-along, happy-ending video. This is a portrayal of a rough-trot life that is all too familiar and, for many, will hit achingly close to home. It’s as much about parenthood and protection as it is GLBT rights. It deals with the joy of family – however much it deviates from the nuclear format – as much as it sheds life on the truly dark and seedy underbelly of strip club lifestyles. It takes on violence, influencing youth, city living, escaping hardship and finding out what means the most to you in this life. It’s a truly unforgiving audio-visual experience, but one that will leave your reaping its rewards for a damn long time yet.

Read my original post on Hey Jane here.

+++

There you go, guys! Sorry about the delays but I really hope you enjoy these videos as much as I enjoyed writing about them!

The other 20 videos can be found here, here, here and, of course, here!

We’re back to all-new videos next week, so I’ll see you then!

Top 30 Videos of 2011: The Top 10!

You guys! This is it!

I’ve teased you for long enough, dragged this fucker out as far as I could possibly stretch it. Now, at the end of the month, you all finally get to experience the ten best music videos released before December 31st, 2011 and after December 31st, 2010. Here, boys and girls, are Yes, We’ve Got a Video!‘s top ten for 2011!

10. Bon Iver – Holocene
Directed by Nabil Elderkin

I’ve often said that the best music videos can create a perfect atmosphere for the song that is its soundtrack. Many fine examples of this are scattered throughout the top 30, but I feel like very few came as close to this  than the effort for Bon Iver‘s second single from the strangely-titled Bon Iver, Bon Iver. Shot in the breathtakingly gorgeous surrounds of Iceland, a little boy wordlessly explores parts of this glorious country. It almost feels as though time is slowing down when you watch this video, taking in the excitement and the awe and the utter wonder that comes with this little boy. It’s a video in which you can’t just watch while you’re doing other things, checking emails or poking the person you like on Facebook or whatever else have you. It’s a full involvement – and this alone should serve as proof that the art of the music video is not dead. Videos like Holocene matter – and if you didn’t know that already, perhaps now is the time.

Read my original blog on Holocene here.

9. SebastiAn – Embody
Directed by So Me

Here’s a left-field smash from a couple of eccentric Parisians – director So Me and electronica producer SebastiAn. The latter is certainly not one to shy away from confronting and confusing imagery – you only have to take one glimpse at his album cover for Total, in which he is making out with himself, to know that. Teaming up with So Me seemed to be the perfect match, then, as the robotic electronica track is turned into the soundtrack for a peculiar tale of dancing, imagination and being lost in the music. The entire time, the viewer is left to wonder how much of this is “real” – or, at least, as “real” as something can get in a music video context. The ending won’t help, either way. It’s all still up in the air. What does this young man represent as he dances throughout the town and in a variety of situations? I say it all depends on how much you invest in Embody, and how you respond on an emotional basis to this seemingly surreal montage. There are dozens of end results, subsequently, and that’s part of what makes this such an excellent video. Nothing quite like it came out in 2011.

8. Brendan Maclean – Cold and Happy
Directed by Peter Ireland

Top ten twice in a row? You’d better believe that Brendan Maclean and Brisbane director Peter Ireland are onto something. After the wild circus-tent madness that was Practically Wasted, the opening number from B-Mac’s White Canvas EP, the second single was a more subdued affair – initially, at least. Maclean has gone from a manic split personality of the slave and the master to a humble bingo night runner. It all seems sweet, up until a cheeky elder citizen decides to do something a little different with dessert than just eat it. You’ve probably guessed where this is headed, but it’s not the predictability that is Cold and Happy‘s selling point. It’s the utter charm of the thing – the liveliness, the sweet nature, the subtle streak of naughtiness. Cold and Happy is a joy to watch, every single time.

Read my original blog on Cold and Happy here.

7. Tyler, the Creator – Yonkers
Directed by Wolf Haley

Kanye West had no bones about straight-up calling this “the video of the year.” Not too outlandish – except, let’s remind you, that he said this back in February, when the video was released. Nearly a year on and he’s not too far from the truth. How could Yeezy – as well as Tyler, the Creator himself – have gotten it so right? After all, it’s not like Yonkers sets out to be anything inventive or fun – it’s quite intentionally an off-putting and ugly video. Shot in ghoulish black and white, Tyler raps on a chair before eating a cockroach, vomits and then hangs himself. It’s vile, it’s indulgent, it’s creepy, it’s… well, it’s utterly watchable and completely fascinating. For all of its efforts to turn Tyler into a vile creature, it becomes increasingly difficult to turn away from the video – no matter how much the envelope is pushed. Having Tyler himself as the central character with literally no-one else apart from the aforementioned cockroach in the video also engages you as a viewer in a very confronting one-on-one perspective. To me, Tyler was easily the water cooler act of the year – from this to the controversy surrounding the Odd Future Wolf Gang Kill Them All crew, it seems that nearly every music fan was discussing this very peculiar young man. I think the greatest thing that can be said, though, is this: whether you were a fan of the group or whether they sent you into a hyperbolic “think of the children” frenzy not seen this side of when Eminem was relevant, Tyler, the Creator made music fans feel something either way. Bold and brazen, Yonkers was definitely a clip that needed to be seen to be believed.

6. Katy Perry – Last Friday Night (T.G.I.F.)
Directed by Marc Klasfield

I feel like there’s been a major renaissance in the top 40 pop video in the past few years. You could certainly link this to acts like Lady Gaga, who took out the top spot in last year’s countdown with flying colours thanks to the game-changing Telephone. Overall, though, I think it’s just a case of a lot of pop acts realising that there is more to a clip than just to move numbers, and for gratuitous bitches and bling. It’s an art form, and one that can be celebrated no matter what walk of musical life you come from. Sadly, aside from outstanding efforts from both Ke$ha and Britney Spears, no pop act quite managed to cause quite the frenzy that Gaga did last year – not even Gaga herself, with a slew of mostly quite disappointing videos from her batch of Born The Way singles. May it be put on the record, however, that the divine miss Katy Perry came the absolute closest.

A singles and video machine, Perry secured two positions in last year’s countdown for Firework and California Gurls, but in 2011 she managed to make a video that was greater than all of her previous ones combined. Put quite simply, Last Friday Night was the pop video event of the year. Amazing, then, that this happened without Perry herself even appearing in the video. Not even once! There was a young lady who looked remarkably like her, though – thirteen-year-old Kathy Beth Terry, a daggy teen who simply got caught up in a whole heap of craziness one Friday night. Whilst trying to study, she became distracted by the party across the road, hosted by the adorable Rebecca Black; furiously heading over there to sort out the mess. The rest, as they say, is history: Hanson rock up, Kenny G plays a sax solo, Artie from Glee falls in love and kicks arse… all in all, it’s one hell of a party.

This easily set itself up as one of the most fun-loving and delightful viewing experiences of the year. The whole team really went all-out here, delivering a gorgeously glossy pop video that truly did take the meaning of the song to another level. The chunks of pop-culture-reference gold also makes this a must-see video for all pop trainspotters out there. See if you recognise who the parents of Kathy are near the end of the clip, for instance! There’s just so much to enjoy about this. Don’t act like you’re too cool for it.

Read my original blog on Last Friday Night (T.G.I.F.) here.

5. Manchester Orchestra – Simple Math
Directed by Daniels

Pretty much anyone who’s heard more than a fleeting moment of Manchester Orchestra‘s music is sure to confirm that this isn’t an act that does things half-heartedly. They are an all-in, often quite heart-wrenching experience – and that’s just from listening to them. It gets all the more powerful when given an audio-visual aspect, as proven with this stunning visual companion to the title track of the band’s excellent third album. In this clip – the second appearance in the countdown from the unstoppable Daniels direction team – a series of road-related experiences are tied together in a seemingly jumbled memory. It takes awhile for the whole thing to sink in and be properly understood, but holy mother of God when this thing hits…it hits hard. Artistic beauty, and something that everyone involved should be so incredibly proud of.

Read my original blog on Simple Math here.

4. World Order – Machine Civilisation
Directed by Genki Sudo

“I am around the odd section of YouTube once again,” exclaims a user of the site, commenting on a music video. It’s a common expression amongst users, often going down “holes” (in which one clicks on a related video, then the a related video of that related video, and so on), often coming across very bizarre and crudely-made videos the further they go down said “hole.” Were such a hole to lead them to something as original, creative and downright awe-inspiring as Machine Civilization, the stunning music video from Japanese collective World Order, one would have to think that the destination was more than worth the journey.

What can be said about a video that is bound to leave you speechless? A team of seven men – including Genki Sudo, the brains behind World Order and the director of the video – begin their journey at what appears to be Tokyo airport.  From there, they defy both time and physics with some out of the ordinary choreography, moving from seaside wharfs to industrial lots with their shapeshifting dances. I’m not sure if dancing is the right word for it, but whatever they are doing… man, some of it just defies belief. If this video doesn’t make you stop dead in your tracks at least half a dozen times, you’re not watching the right video.

It’s worth mentioning all of it was done in real-time, too – all that shit that looks as though it’s totally warped and slowed down is a genius optical illusion. No kidding. Machine Civilisation is a shining example of exactly what can happen when one ends up on the odd section of YouTube. A song brought to life in a way that no-one could have seen coming.

3. Kimbra – Cameo Lover
Directed by Guy Franklin

To me, the most powerful command issued in pop music all year was probably the most simple – “Open up your heart!” as sung by the stunning Kimbra Johnson. Her noble quest to get the person on the receiving end of said command is brought to life through this clip, making for some absolutely wondrous results. It’s been a fantastic year for Kimbra, dropping her debut album in Vows and selling out shows all around the place. For all those achievements, though, I can’t help but feel nothing quite compared to the outright endorphin-releasing delights of the Cameo Lover video. Can you blame me? Have you seen this thing? With its technicolour landscape, delightful costumed characters… oh, and that ENDING! Holy shit, I don’t think any video has quite responded to the glory of a key change in such gorgeous fashion. I have watched this video possibly more than I have watched any other clip this year, and it still makes me as giddy as anything when I watch it. It’s just an absolute treat for the senses. Exactly why the hell HAVEN’T you opened up your heart yet?

Read my original blog on Cameo Lover here.

2. Children Collide – Loveless
Directed by David Michôd

Sometimes, sacrifices are made in order to create a great music video. It could be doing some crazy shit with fire, some mad stunts, even learning to jump rope (as the previously-listed Bluejuice had to do). In this instance, Children Collide‘s frontman Johnny Mackay sacrificed his most defining visual aspect – his long flowing locks – in order to create this dark, confronting and shatteringly powerful video. Seemingly not a big sacrifice – surely rockstars get a slab of “get a haircut” jibes all the time. Not only is this Children Collide’s best video, it’s amongst one of the greatest works of art this country has produced in the last few years. Hyperbole? Sure, if you want to play it like that. But watch this video from start to finish, without any distractions, and just see if it doesn’t feel like the visual equivalent of being punched in the guts.

There is no escaping Mackay’s desperation as he sits close to the camera, spitting out the lyrics with the kind of cathartic vitriol you can only imagine was in his mind when he wrote them to begin with. He begins with a headful of hair and a face full of clown make-up, both of which are forcefully taken from him as he sits there and gets what is coming to him. As the lyrics describe the demise of a relationship, Mackay himself lets go of everything resembling him – including playing the clown, explaining the Joker-esque makeup. An obvious metaphor, maybe, but don’t like it didn’t paint you curious the second his face appeared on-screen.

While there are a lot of very broad and powerful expressions here, I found the most impact in the subtler moments of the clip. Director David Michôd, responsible for the landmark Animal Kingdom, holds down Mackay in one scene with a firm headlock – a small but startling part of proceedings. At the very end, Mackay also runs his hands through his newly shaved head and freshly clean face… only for us as the viewers to find that he has been handcuffed this entire time. It slays me every time – this tiny little twist, one that most might not even pick up the first time around; representing the trapped, helpless feelings conveyed throughout both the song and the video. And it’s moments like these that make this video what it is. Loveless is a deeply personal and often quite scathing vision – essential viewing, but it may cut much too close to the bone for some. In many ways, that’s the point.

Read my original blog on Loveless here.

1. Gotye featuring Kimbra - Somebody That I Used to Know
Directed by Natasha Pincus

Yep. You probably guessed it. Maybe I’m that obvious, or maybe you’ve found this whole list to be predictable. Or – maybe, just maybe, there was absolutely no contest as to who would take out the top spot when it came to the year’s greatest videos. Think about it for just a second. Has any video from this year generated this kind of response? This kind of movement? This kind of emotional reaction? This many bloody reposts on Facebook? This was the year that Wally de Backer - best known to you and I as Gotye – became perhaps the most unlikely popstar Australia has produced this century, aside from maybe Luke Steele. Eyes Wide Open got the ball rolling – it fell just shy of our top 10 last year, coming in at number 11 – but the song and video phenomenon of Somebody is where the tide truly changed.

With body paint, stop-motion photography and no-one except Gotye and miss Kimbra Johnson (back so soon, ma’am?) in the video, this was a shining example of a living, breathing work of art. It takes you by surprise the first time. “Were they really butt-naked? That’s how much of their body covered in paint? How are they both that good-looking?” Maybe that last one’s just me. The second time, you notice the littler things – the apathy in Wally’s eyes in the first verse, the passion of that first chorus and the way he just winces as though a band-aid has been torn off his person after Kimbra sings to him.

As for Kimbra, it’s in the way she shrugs her shoulders and glides to his side. It’s that look of utter desperation and remorse when she howls into Wally’s face, while he never makes eye contact. By the time he does, it’s too late. They stare at one another from a distance – longingly, regrettibly – before it suddenly cuts to black. It should be noticed that this is when they are simply observed. It’s in the views that come after this – and, for most, there were more than plenty – in which the smaller pieces of the puzzle truly began to be felt. For many, it hit like a truck – whether you had felt the pain of either character, whether you were in the right or in the wrong, this video resonated. It smacked you in the face. It really made you think. With all of that in mind, how many videos can you honestly say has done that to you in this, or any other year?

Somebody That I Used to Know is a unique, artistic experience. A video that will certainly grow iconic in its status. A video that notched up the bar for Australian music videos and music video makers (kudos, Natasha Pincus) and still managed to clear it.

Video of the year? Of course – it’s the obvious choice, after all.

Read my original blog on Somebody That I Used to Know here.

***

That’s it! Thanks so much to all of the artists, all of the directors, all of the producers, cinematographers… EVERYONE who worked on these videos! Your efforts are remarkable, and if I could have given you anything more than my highest of accolades than I would in a heartbeat!

Yes, We’ve Got a Video! resumes normal programming this time next week. Until, then, make sure you’re caught up with the following:

Don’t forget to leave a comment below; or, of course, drop me an email!

See you guys soon!

Watch This Now: Children Collide – “Loveless”

“You will be happy to know that I’ve moved on as well…”

I really, really shouldn’t have let this one go under my radar. Children Collide are no strangers to having an awesome video – let us not forget We Are Amphibious, or even the first single from their last album, Jellylegs. This one, however, the third and final single from the Theory of Everything record, is in a league of its own. In collaboration with director David Michôd, the band have delivered their finest video ever – a chilling reflection on their slowest and most heartfelt single to date. This isn’t the Children Collide you see thrashing about like crazy motherfuckers any other week on tour – this runs far deeper.

It’s even more amazing, still, to think that the band did this with one take, one camera, one backdrop and only one band member involved – vocalist/guitarist Johnny Mackay. Donned in clown makeup, he is transmogrified before your very eyes – I won’t give away what happens if you haven’t seen the video, but there’s a good chance that you’ll be left in fair amounts of shock by the end of it all. It’s confronting, at times even grotesque, but it all turns into something quite beautiful, reflective of the aching themes of the song itself. No Australian act has made a video this important and essential so far this year. They probably won’t for the rest of it.


Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 252 other followers

%d bloggers like this: